St John the Baptist Frome

St John the Baptist Frome - Disability and autism access for Rainbow Church service

Church website
Parking
Disabled Parking
http://www.sjfrome.co.uk
https://en.parkopedia.co.uk/parking/near/st-john-the-baptist-12

There is a cobbled courtyard in front of the main church entrance, accessible from the main road, under an archway, where parking spaces will be available. Please only use these if you are disabled.  The ground is very uneven in parts. At the time of the audit there was a sign saying “car club”.  If that sign is still there at the event, please ignore it. These spaces are for church parking.

Ground in disabled parking bay

Ground around disabled parking

Wrong sign in disabled parking area

Access

You can drop off passengers at the church before finding parking in one of the two town car-parks within easy walking distance of the church.

Frome is very hilly and the church is halfway up the main street above the centre of the town. The area around the church is reasonably level, although the cobbles are very old and could be a hazard for some people.

How to enter the church – There are 3 front doors into the church. The left door has a gentle ramp for wheelchair access.. The main, central doorway has some stone ridges. Once inside, the main surface of the nave is a flagstone floor with no level changes, although the flagstones are worn smooth in places.

Main road access IMG_4891.JPG

Church entry points IMG_4892.JPG

Ramped Doorway (left) IMG_4894.JPG

Flooring

There  is a bumpy stone ledge at the main entrance. It is not very visible. It is followed by a piece of carpet and another bumpy ledge.  The floor in the nave is flagstone, worn in parts. There is a large piece of carpet in the left side-aisle. It is stuck down with black tape.

Floor at main door into church

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Floor in nave

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Floor in right side aisle

Kitchen and seating area

In the left aisle there are tables and seating areas. This is where tea and coffee will be served

Serving area for drinks

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Seating area

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Seating area

Toilet

The entry to the one large toilet is at the end of the left aisle. The door is signposted. You walk through a curtain and a first door. This takes you into a lobby space with red and black tiles. A set of steps is ahead of you. Do not use these steps. To your left there is a wooden door that leads into the toilet. The door is locked from the inside with a bolt. The bolt is at the top left of the door so children cannot lock themselves in. This can be a problem for wheelchair users who may need to ask someone to wait outside and tell other people that the toilet is occupied.

There are paper hand-towels and non-scented Carex antibacterial hand wash in the toilet.

Access to 1st door to toilet

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Floor in lobby outside toilet

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Toilet door with lock

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Toilet

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Wheelchair users

On the left side of the nave there is a wide pew for wheelchair users

Wide pew with space for wheelchairs

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Quiet spaces:

There is no quiet room, but there is a quiet area at the back, right of the church with a children’s corner with seating.

 

Children’s corner with seating

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Accessible toilet

Yes

Hearing loop

Loop system covers the central nave of the church... limited effectiveness in side aisles and no effect in chancel.

Large print books

A large print version of the service and hymmns will be made available. Please ask if you will need this.

Braille hymn books

No

Any other comments

No auditory disturbances were noted at the time of audit.

There are 2 organs – a pipe organ to the left as you face the altar, which may make strange noises when being set up for playing; and a digital organ, usually used to accompany hymns.

No noisy hand driers in the wc.

Overall the church seems dimly, but adequately lit. There are ceiling spots high above the side aisles and good daylight coming from west and east through the centre of the church.

No noisy lighting or heating was observed.

With thanks to Ann Memmott, a national autism advisor whose autism work informs the Church of England.